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Posted by akane42me on 2017.03.28 at 10:54
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Rapport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee is ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk!




March 28, 2017
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet.”

- Shakespeare



 Okay, let’s give it a try:

“Napoleon, what are you doing tonight?”  Illya asked.

The American looked up from his typewriter, eyeing the Russian warily.  “Why do you ask?”

“I have two tickets to the ballet, and thought you might want to accompany me,” said the blue-eyed agent.

“You can’t go.  I need you to work tonight,” said the CEA to the junior agent.

The blond said, “You mean you need me to finish your paperwork so you can go on a date.”

The brunet smiled, and pulled two ballet tickets from his pocket.  “I’m taking Wanda.”  He stood.

The shorter agent shook his head at the taller man.  “You don’t even like the ballet.”

“But I like Wanda,” said his hazel-eyed partner.
 ------


Something smells, all right.  Forgive the over illustration:)

Epithet -  an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing.

It’s fine to use an epithet to identify a character we don’t know, such as a thick-necked Thrush.  But when it comes to Solo and Kuryakin, irrelevant, overused epithets is a common mistake in fanfic.  But we already know these guys. Using their nationality, rank, or physical attributes instead of their names doesn’t add relevance. Maybe the writer thinks repeating the character's name sounds boring. Maybe the writer is trying to avoid pronoun confusion.


Your thoughts? Your advice to writers on using epithets?



How's the writing going this week?  Feel free to share a snippet!

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.03.21 at 12:41
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Rapport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee is ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk!




March 21, 2017

“Here is a lesson in creative writing. First rule: Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you've been to college.”
- Kurt Vonnegut

“With educated people, I suppose, punctuation is a matter of rule; with me it is a matter of feeling. But I must say I have a great respect for the semi-colon; it's a useful little chap.”
- Abraham Lincoln


 I came across Vonnegut’s quotation about semicolons last week.

Kurt, why are you picking on transvestite hermaphrodites?  That’s just wrong. And Kurt, semicolons damned well do represent something. I don’t know exactly what it is, but Miss Ruff, my sixth-grade teacher did, and valiantly explained it to us. I know full well, as does Abraham Lincoln, that the semicolon is useful. I just don't use them. As for being a showoff if you use them? Phooey, Kurt. Just phooey. You have issues, Kurt, and it ain’t punctuation.



His friend scuffled down the path; the grass was worn down to dirt by countless others before them.

That’s a line from something I wrote ten years ago. You're right, I said I don't use semicolons. Originally, I wrote that line as two sentences. MS Word flagged them, suggesting a semicolon to join the sentences. I had to look up semicolons in ‘The Elements of Style’ before deciding to go along with the suggestion. I can't remember using a semicolon since then.

When I read what Kurt V. had to say about semicolons, I got out my Strunk and White for a refresher. Here's what they say:

“If two or more clauses grammatically complete and not joined by a conjunction are to form a single compound sentence, the proper mark of punctuation is a semicolon.

    Mary Shelley’s works are entertaining; they are full of engaging ideas.

    It is nearly half past five; we cannot reach town before dark.

It is, of course, equally correct to write each of these as two sentences, replacing the semicolons with periods.

    Mary Shelley’s works are entertaining. They are full of engaging ideas.

    It is nearly half past five. We cannot reach town before dark.

If a conjunction is inserted, the proper mark is a comma.

    Mary Shelley’s works are entertaining, for they are full of engaging ideas.

    It is nearly half past five, and we cannot reach town before dark.

A comparison of the three forms given above will show clearly the advantage of the first. It is, at least in the examples given, better than the second form because it suggests the close relationship between the two statements in a way that the second does not attempt, and better than the third because it is briefer and therefore more forcible. Indeed, this simple method of indicating relationship between statements is one of the most useful devices of composition. The relationship, as above, is commonly one of cause and consequence.”

----

I doubt I will begin using semicolons, even after this refresher. Sorry, Miss Ruff. They’re just not my style.  Occasionally, I come across a fanfic that uses a lot of them. There’s no cut and dry rule for how many semicolons is too many, but if I am distracted by them, that’s too many.

Where do you stand on semicolon usage?  Are you a Kurt Vonnegut or an Abraham Lincoln?


How's the writing going this week?  Feel free to share a snippet!

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.03.14 at 09:05
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Rapport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

I drank half the coffee already.  Grab a mug before it's gone!  Let's talk!


March 14, 2017

"The thing you are most afraid to write, write that."
- Unknown

"If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word."
- Margaret Atwood

"There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you."
- Maya Angelou


When the writing gets hard, keep writing.
When the right words won't come, keep writing.
When you have no idea where the story is going, keep writing.
When writer's block stops you, keep writing.
When you're too busy to write, keep writing.
When you're not in the mood, keep writing.
When you tell yourself you're too sick to write, keep writing.
When you're on vacation, keep writing.
When you think you will never write again, keep writing.

Last week I wrote 'Keep Writing' at the top of my to-do list. It sounds silly even to me, but that gentle reminder helped me to write more.  Some days I wrote for 15 minutes here and there throughout the day. I had one nice session, got lost in the story, and was late for work. A couple of days I wrote nothing. My goal this week is to write every day, even if it's just a sentence or two. For inspiration, I wrote this quote on a sticky note and stuck it next to my laptop:

"This is how you do it: You sit down at the keyboard and you put one word after another until it's done. It's that easy, and that hard." -- Neil Gaiman


A snippet from a scene with Kuryakin and Angelique:

A whisper in the dark.
"He says you are jealous, Mr. Kuryakin."
A caress, soft silk, sliding across his face.
"I wonder if he realizes what he said.  I wonder if he may be correct."



Do you have some encouraging words to share?  Fill in the blank:  When ______________________, keep writing.

How is the writing going this week?  Feel free to share a line or two!
And keep writing:)

nsikeastereggs

Easter Eggs 2017 - First Reminder

Posted by frau_flora on 2017.03.12 at 00:32
Tags:
Easter Bunny wants you!


glitter-graphics.com

Yes, Easter Bunny wants you to sign up for Easter Eggs 2017. No excuses! Learn all about it here. And then sign up! Don't make Easter Bunny cry!

My default

The Alphabet Affair - Q

Posted by spikesgirl58 on 2017.03.10 at 06:55
The Alphabet Affair - Chapter Q
Author - Spikesgirl58
Genre: slash
Rating: PG
Prompts: Quarrel and Queasy


It seemed as if it had taken a week to shake themselves loose from police custody. Even with Mr. Waverly’s help, Liveredge has tried to keep them there, hoping, Napoleon guessed, to pry information from him.

The club was dark now, the gaudy neon lights no longer making the puddles a kaleidoscope of colors.
What do you think?”

“Well, the car is gone, but it could have been towed.” Despite his concern, Napoleon was not anxious to rush inside. He’d made that mistake once and while Jack was a good agent, he wasn’t Illya. “We have no way of know if they are inside there or not.

“To be filed under ‘What it’s worth,’ usually when Kevin is in trouble, I get a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach and so far, I’m feeling fine.”

“I wish I could say the same thing.”

“You feel okay?”
Read more...Collapse )


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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.03.07 at 10:57
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

We have butter toffee flavored coffee today. Grab a mug. Let's talk!


March 7, 2017

“The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.”
- Sylvia Plath



Illya Kuryakin has been shot. He is lying on the sidewalk on his back. Angelique walks up to him, picks up his gun, stands over him, points the gun at him, and speaks. Kuryakin looks up at her and tries to answer her.

It’s last Thursday morning. I’ve revised this scene three times. Tightening up the dialogue, tweaking the writing. Does Angelique even need to point Kuryakin’s gun at him? It’s an entertaining image. But if she put his gun in her purse, it would show how thoroughly she’s beaten him. She don’t need no stinkin’ gun. I’m watching Kuryakin watch her put the gun in her purse and – Oh, geez. He can see up her dress.

How many times have I gone over this scene, and I’m only noticing this now? I can’t believe how dumb—

I know. I’ll turn him on his side. I’ll immobilize him so he can’t turn his head to look up at her. He can only see her shoes as she walks up to him. He can only see her hand pick up the gun. But he can still roll his eyes upward. Kuryakin’s a champion eye roller. Okay, Kuryakin’s gun can hit the sidewalk and slide a few feet away so Angelique doesn’t have to stand over him.  Wait, what’s wrong with him looking up her dress? Hey, that’s the breaks. She can see him looking up her dress, call him a boor, and step back.  Or he can compliment her on her lace undies. No, Kuryakin  wouldn’t act that way. He’s a gentleman. He’d close his eyes.

I’m spinning my wheels over something that has no influence on the story. Think. Think. Decide, already. I’m never going to finish this story if –
My inner critic tells me I’m unimaginative and will never get this story right.  Some days she goes on and on until I hate the story and fear I will never become a decent writer.

I put a note at the top of the scene: Fix this later. Three magic words. Self-criticism has to come from a positive place, to improve the writing. But turn a deaf ear to that inner critic if she's being negative. No matter how bad it is, it can always be fixed.


Does your inner critic nag you?  How do you get her to shut up?

How is the writing going this week?  Feel free to share a line or two!

Pen Paper Coffee


It's time for March's New Beta Challenge!

This month, the prompts are Quarrel and Queasy!


One or both prompts may be used for your story.
Stories can be 500 words or longer - no maximum limit.

Any genre is welcome.  Both TV-verse and Movie-verse are welcome!

You can post your story to MFUWSS any time.
If you miss the deadline, no worries. Submit it anyway!  

All readers are encouraged to be a Beta - just leave your feedback in the comments!

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.02.28 at 17:59
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

I'm running late today.  Let's pour wine in our coffee mugs:)


February 28, 2017

“Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write. [It] was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.’”
-Anne Lamott, “Bird by Bird”



A few years ago I bought a jigsaw puzzle called “One Hundred Cats and a Fish.”  I started putting it together with my grandsons last night during a family get-together. It has 1000 pieces. A lot of them are all-white. It’s hard to believe I’ll ever finish it.   My plan is to stop each time I go past the puzzle on the table and figure out where just one piece goes.

I’m taking that approach with writing lately.  I’ve had two busy weeks, with most mornings taken up by other stuff every day before work. Normally I’d throw in the towel and tell myself I don’t have time to write.  But I decided to keep my WIP up on the laptop and plonk away on it for 15 minutes here and there during the day. Or I’ve worked in a notebook. I look at the last bit I worked on, then do a little bit more.

Bird by bird, buddy. Little by little, I continue to make progress. I feel more engaged with the story than I have in a long time.


How do you cope with busy times? Do you get up extra early to make time to write? Do you steal a few spare moments if time allows? Do you throw in the towel?



How is the writing going this week?  Feel free to share a line or two!

nsikeastereggs

Questions about Easter Eggs?

Posted by frau_flora on 2017.02.25 at 23:32
Tags:
If you have any questions about the Easter Eggs gift exchange and didn't find the answers in my previous post, please ask them here. I will try to answer them asap. Which means, as soon as my time zone allows. ;-)

nsikeastereggs

Easter Eggs at mfuwss are back!

Posted by frau_flora on 2017.02.25 at 23:26
Tags:
Here's Easter Bunny and you know what that means...

glitter-graphics.com

Yes, it's that time of year again. Easter 2017 is just seven weeks away and that means it's time to start asking for your own tailor-made Easter Egg and/or promise one to another cousin.

And now the boring part. Most of you know how this works but for those who don't, all new cousins who joined us over the past year and everybody who has never heard about this gift exchange, here are the rules again:

An Easter Egg at mfuwss is a drabble or a short story of 100-500 words. Small and sweet, just like an Easter Egg should be. ;-) Everyone who wants one should comment here and ask for it. Please tell us if you want your Easter Egg to be gen or slash and give us one or two prompts to be used.

And since we have some very talented artists in our midst: If you'd rather ask for a work of art instead of a story, please do!

Easter Bunnies (writers and artists) can take a look at this wish list and if they find a wish they would like to fulfill they can claim it, i.e. comment anonymously (not logged in to LJ) and state that this wish is taken. They should then write a short piece of no more than 500 words or produce a work of art for their recipient, according to her preferences.

All Easter Bunnies should then post their eggs (stories or art) under their LJ name, not anonymously, beginning on Good Friday (14. April) and through Easter Monday (17. April). The header should be something like "Easter Egg for (LJ name of recipient)".

Everyone can participate. You can ask for an Easter Egg even if you're not a writer or artist yourself and therefore can't give one. Everyone should be aware, though, that their wishes may not be fulfilled as we're not assigning writers to recipients; we'd like to keep this as informal as possible. But I'm sure there's something we can do if we find orphaned wishes. ;-)

There won't be any deadlines except for Easter, when we expect all Easter Eggs to be posted. That means theoretically you can still make a wish two days before Easter but you might not want to wait that long. ;-) We'll post some reminders just in case...

Oh, and to all Easter Bunnies: If for whatever reason you find that you won't be able to, um, lay your egg ;-), please just delete the comment you claimed the wish with. That way we can spot wishes that have become orphaned and do something about them. If that happens, of course all other authors/artists can claim those wishes anew.

If you have any questions, please don't ask them here, this post is only for compiling our wish list. I'll open a second post just for questions where you can ask away to your heart's content.

Easter Eggs 2017 officially starts NOW! Everybody have lots of fun!


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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.02.21 at 10:51
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk:)


February 21, 2017

"In our family, there was no clear line between religion and fly-fishing."
- Norman Maclean

"You can lead a horticulture, but you can't make her think."
- Dorothy Parker

"To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness."
- Oscar Wilde

Illya Kuryakin: "Oh, by the way, Bufferton is dead."
Napoleon Solo: "Well, that's life."




Are you smiling?

I like to write humorous stories once in a while, stuff I hope will make the reader laugh out loud. I enjoy the goofy mood I get in, walking around for days in silly land.

The story I'm working on these days is dark and moody. For balance, the opening scene's got some Kuryakin sarcasm, and the middle's got an Angelique/Victor dialogue intended to be humorous but it's not there yet. It's fun to work on this part, to smile in the middle of things. Writing humor for Solo and Kuryakin, for Angelique and Victor is always fun. They are smart people, and they say smart things that are funny. I like that kind of humor.

Do you write funny stories? Do you inject humor into your stories?
What have you been working on this week?  How's the writing going?
The goofiest MFU fic I've writtenCollapse )

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.02.14 at 10:39
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk:)


February 14, 2017

"I adore adverbs; they are the only qualifications I really much respect."
- Henry James

"The road to hell is paved with adverbs."
- Stephen King

"If you are using an adverb, you are using the wrong verb."
- Kingsley Amis


It's Valentine's Day.  Let's talk about the love-hate relationship writers have with adverbs.

I came across a chapter on adverbs in 'Writing Tools' by Roy Peter Clark.
"Tool 5. Watch those adverbs. Use them to change the meaning of words."

Wait. What? Use them?  So adverbs aren't purely evil?  Whoops. So adverbs aren't evil incarnate?

Clark says, "At their best, adverbs spice up a verb or adjective. At their worst, they express a meaning already contained in it:
The blast completely destroyed the church office.
The cheerleader gyrated wildly before the screaming fans.
The accident totally severed the boy's arm.
The spy peered furtively through the bushes."

In these examples, Clark says we should drop the adverb because it "shortens the sentence, sharpens the point, and creates elbow room for the verb. Feel free to disagree."  I agree with Clark's advice to drop those adverbs, but I like that he allows the writer the freedom to choose.

A second fix is to find a better verb. Clark says, "How much better that "the audience pattered applause" than that it "applauded politely."

Clark shows us how adverbs can be a good thing - when they change the meaning of the verb. "To understand the difference between a good adverb and a bad adverb, consider these two sentences: "She smiled happily" and "She smiled sadly." Which one works best? The first seems weak because "smiled" contains the meaning of "happily." On the other hand, "sadly" changes the meaning."

Finally, Clark talks about attributes used by J.K. Rowling, who loves adverbs:
"said Hermione timidly."
"said Hermione faintly."
'he said simply."
"said Hagrid grumpily."
"said Hagrid irritably."

Oh boy. Attributes. That's a topic in itself.

Clarks' final advice? "If you want more money than the Queen of England, maybe you should use more adverbs. If your aspirations, like mine, are more modest, use them sparingly."


Are you an ever-vigilant scrubber of adverbs? When do you use them?

What have you been working on this week?  How's the writing going?  Feel free to share a snippet!

Illya sneaking

The Alphabet Affair - Chapter P

Posted by spikesgirl58 on 2017.02.13 at 04:43
Tags:
Title - The Alphabet Affair - Chapter P
Author: Spikesgirl58
Genre - slash
Word count - 1,000
Prompts - Power and Prey



Kevin Lean was a very unhappy UNCLE agent. Not only had his partner gone missing, but it was obvious, even to Illya, that the fun aspect of dressing up had long lost its charm. He stared off into the distance, the rapidly changing lights reflecting across his face. Then Illya noticed the man’s eyes were glassy.

“Kevin, are you okay?” When the man didn’t respond, Illya reached out and turned his face towards him. “Kevin, are you ready to go?”

“But can I go here?” He took repossession of his face and looked towards the bathroom across the dance floor. “I don’t think I’m going to make it over there.”

That’s when Illya noted that Lean’s glass was half empty. “Maybe we need to get you some fresh air.” He stood and helped Lean to his feet. “You are such a lightweight, my dear” he said loudly. Softer, he asked, “Can you make under your own power?”

“I can try.” Lean took a shaky step and nearly collapsed to the floor.

“Trouble, gentleman?” A waiter dressed as a playing card approached them.

“I think my friend was over-served. I’m just taking him out for some air.”
Read more...Collapse )

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.02.07 at 09:32
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk:)


February 7, 2017

"Reading is what probably leads most writers to writing."
- Richard Ford

"Read, read, read. Read everything -- trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You'll absorb it. Then write. If it's good, you'll find out. If it's not, throw it out of the window."
- William Faulkner


Write better by reading. Read better by writing.

I love to read.  I learned to read when I was four.  I wrote my first poem in fourth grade and started my first novel in sixth grade. I don't write a lot, but I know that reading often inspires me to sit down and do some writing.
This weekend I was sick, and did nothing but sleep and read.  Here's what I've been reading:

"Writing Down the Bones" by Natalie Goldberg.  I wound up skimming most of it. I loved it when I first read it years ago, but it was too touchy-feely for me this time around. Maybe because I was sick and grumpy.

"Ordinary People" by Judith Guest.  Goldberg's book has a blurb on the front cover: "Foreword by Judtith Guest, author of Ordinary People."  I'd never read it, and have meant to for years. When MTM passed away, it prompted me to request the book from the library.

"Guns, Germs, and Steel - The Fates of Human Societies" by Jared Diamond.  It was a birthday gift from my son Ben, who shares my love of reading. I don't read a lot of NF and know I should do so more often.

"Lila" by Marilynne Robinson.  I spotted it on a clearance rack at B&N and got it for 5 bucks!  What a deal!  Her writing makes me want to be a better writer.

Two books with the number twenty two in the title, purely coincidence:
"Catch-22" by Joseph Heller.  I was in the mood to revisit an old fave. Not sure how many times I've read it.
"Tricky Twenty-Two" by Janet Evanovich.  I read Evanovich to remind myself that sometimes it's just for fun.

Do you read a lot?  Have you got a favorite book or author who inspires you to write well?


What have you been working on this week?  How's the writing going?

Pen Paper Coffee


It's time for February's New Beta Challenge!

This month, the prompts are Power and Prey!


One or both prompts may be used for your story.
Stories can be 500 words or longer - no maximum limit.

Any genre is welcome.  Both TV-verse and Movie-verse are welcome!

You can post your story to MFUWSS any time.
If you miss the deadline, no worries. Submit it anyway!  

All readers are encouraged to be a Beta - just leave your feedback in the comments!


IDCards

The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.01.31 at 09:20
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk:)


January 31, 2017

"Sit down and put down everything that comes into your head and then you're a writer. But an author is one who can judge his own stuff's worth, without pity, and destroy most of it."
- Collette

False starts. Rewrites.

You're starting a story. You're writing away. You're on fire. The next day you read what you wrote and know it's not going to see the light of day, at least not in the story you're working on.

You've finished a story, tweaked it, and sent it to your beta. She advises you to eliminate an entire section and scrub the characters in it from the whole story, and figure out a different way to get from A to C.  Also, the third act should take place before the second act, so you'll have to jigger the timing of things and add a couple of scenes. When you're done with that, re-write it so the POV is third person, limited to one character.  Then re-write it using past tense.


How do you deal wih false starts and re-writes?  Care to share your experience with us?


What have you been working on this week?  How's the writing going?

cat in tulips

How about a Spring Fling?

Posted by spikesgirl58 on 2017.01.29 at 04:43
Welcome to Spring Fling 2017!

Your challenge as a requestor? Find the perfect picture. It could be about cherry blossoms, new life, new beginnings with old friends. Post it in Scrapbook, along with your preferences - gen, het, slash, TV movie, etc. And then use the tag: Spring Fling 2017 story request. Then sit back. Your work is done.

Your challenge as a writer? Find a posted image that inspires you and claim it anonymously. Stories can be any length necessary to tell it, from a drabble to something much longer. You do not need to write a story to request one, but it's kinda nice if you can.

Posting will be March 18th in MFU_Scrapbook.

Questions? Concerns? Let me know!

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The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.01.24 at 09:53
coffee house mugs

Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!
It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Grab a mug. Let's talk:)


January 24, 2017

"Whatever it takes to finish things, finish. You will learn more from a glorious failure than you ever will from something you never finished."
- Neil Gaimen


WIPs. I have quite a few of them. Some are stories barely begun, maybe a page or two. A few are stories half written and one's mostly written. A few are quite old.
I've got one that makes my New Year's Resolution list every year. I work on it here and there and think, maybe this will be the year I finish it.

Do you have WIPs? Have you got one in particular that you really feel the need to finish, but don't?

What have you been working on this week?  How's the writing going?

IDCards

The Rapport

Posted by akane42me on 2017.01.17 at 10:47

coffee house mugs



January 17, 2017

"The next day you look at the new pages. For once you don't want to burn them or give up writing forever.

It's a start, you say to the room.

That's about it. In the months that follow you bend to the work, because it feels like hope, like grace--and because you know in your lying cheater's heart that sometimes a start is all we ever get."




That's the ending of "The Cheater's Guide to Love", a short story by Junot Diaz.  The narrator, a writer, has lost the love of his life and can't get her back.  After I read it, I put the book down and said, "Oh, yeah."

Nancy Kress, in "Beginnings, Middles, and Ends", has this advice about short story endings:
"...the last paragraph of a short story is the power position--and within that position, the last sentence is the most powerful of all. Often--not infallibly, but often--the last sentence or paragraph evokes the theme of the entire story. Final sentences don't do this like Aesop's fables, flat-footedly stating a moral: Don't count your chickens bebore they hatch. Slow and steady wins the race. Instead, effective final paragraphs use action, symbol, or character's thoughts to seamlessly comment on the story's meaning while also bringing the plot to a close."

I struggle with endings. Many of them should be revised:)  My gut tells me so.

Have you written an ending you like a lot?  Feel like sharing?  What did it take to write it?



Welcome to The Raport - a Tuesday gathering place for writers on MFUWSS!

It's a place to plop down for a visit. A place to talk about what you're working on. About how the writing's going. About your accomplishments. About the bumpy bits along the way. Share a snippet, if you're so inclined!

The coffee's ready. Let's talk:)


Title: The Alphabet Affair - O
Author: Spikesgirl58
Rating: PG
Word Count: 982
Prompts: Obligation and Obsession.

Napoleon Solo traced a gouge in the table top. Someone in the distant past had carved out an initial. Now Napoleon picked at it with his fingernail. For seven hours he’d been held at this police station. The interrogation room smelled of stale coffee and sweat. Napoleon was fairly sure this was the stink of desperation.

He’d spotted his fellow UNCLE agent, Jack Sprat, only once as he was being dragged into a different interrogation room. Napoleon wondered if he was seated at a similar table, listening to an annoying buzz of a fluorescent light ballast, feeling the minutes stretch to hours as their partners remained without back up. He’d felt more at ease in a THRUSH cell. At least those captors believed him when he talked.

Napoleon looked down at his neatly trimmed fingernail. Just hours earlier he’d dragged that fingernail along Illya’s side, feeling the man’s body respond to his touch. God help these officers if anything happened to Illya while Napoleon was being held. He wasn’t about to lose his partner, not when he’d just really found him.
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